Stop the Killing of Tule Elk in Point Reyes

The National Park Service (NPS) is about to finalize a disturbing management plan that would continue fencing tule elk in Point Reyes National Seashore — despite more than 100 elk dying due to lack of water and forage — to prevent elk from competing with private cattle ranches allowed in a National Park.

Interior Secretary Deb Haaland can withdraw the NPS’s harmful plan and stop the killing of endemic tule elk.

Add your name to our petition urging Secretary Haaland to stop this plan before it's too late. #ElkNotCows

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Please Protect Point Reyes National Seashore and Save California's Tule Elk.

Secretary Haaland,

We the undersigned respectfully request you withdraw the National Park Service (NPS) General Management Plan Amendment (GMPA) and preferred alternative for Point Reyes.

The NPS has leased 28,000 acres of federal parklands at Point Reyes National Seashore and the adjacent Golden Gate National Recreation Area for almost 60 years to commercial beef and dairy ranchers. Grazing from these ranches decimates ecosystems, causes water pollution and soil erosion, spreads invasive species and disease, and harms endangered species.

In addition, endemic tule elk are enclosed in fencing despite more than 100 elk dying due to lack of water and forage to prevent elk from competing with private cattle ranches allowed in a National Park.

Designated by the United Nations as an International Biosphere Reserve, Point Reyes National Seashore is home to more than 1,500 species, 100 of which are listed by the state or federal government as threatened, rare, or endangered. Birders scouring the Point Reyes peninsula have identified 490 species, nearly half of the total bird species found in North America. Many California residents and groups, including the NPS and U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, worked for decades to re-establish native tule elk in the park, which supports one of the last surviving populations and is the only national park where the species exists.

The ecological and animal atrocities taking place at Point Reyes National Seashore are deeply disturbing because this national park unit is supposed to be a home and safe haven for California’s wild animals. Private ranching operations are causing widespread damage, massive pollution, and should be immediately removed from the Seashore.

Please help us restore Point Reyes National Seashore and save California's tule elk by withdrawing the National Park Service's General Management Plan Amendment (GMPA) and preferred alternative for Point Reyes.

Thank you for your consideration.